Monday, October 19, 2015

Eye Injury from Airbags in Car Accidents

Even though airbags are part of the passenger safety system in your car, a recent report in Survey of Ophthalmology suggests that the incidence of eye injury and facial trauma from airbags is actually increasing. Why is this be happening?


About Airbags & Eye Injury
Airbags were originally designed as a supplemental safety system to seatbelts-not a replacement for seatbelts in order to help protect your head during high impact frontal collisions and crashes. Because airbags are supplemental-NOT replacements, it is still critical that all passengers use seatbelts even if your car has airbags in the front, back and sides of the passenger cabin. What you need to know is that seatbelts restrict and prevent you from being thrown forward forcefully and colliding with the rearward inflating airbags as they are deployed during a car accident. Airbag deployment and passenger collision with airbags has been reported to cause eye injuries including corneal abrasions, alkali burns and the serious effects of eye compression such as retinal tears, retinal and vitreous hemorrhages, retinal detachment and even cataracts. SO-the message is clear. For eye protection and safety in motor vehicle accidents, all occupants of cars should wear safety belts at all times even if your vehicle has airbags!

If you or someone you know has questions about eye injury from car crashes or accidents or more specifically from airbag impact, please schedule an eye examination at Alabama Eye & Cataract Center in Birmingham by calling 205-930-0930, visiting Alabama Eye & Cataract Center, Google+ or www.facebook.com/michelsonlaservision.

Alabama Eye & Cataract Center in Birmingham is located at UAB-Highlands, 1201 11th Avenue S, Suite 501, Birmingham, Alabama 35205 and staffed by UAB Medicine affiliated ophthalmologists Marc Michelson, M.D. and Tyler Hall, M.D.

Monday, October 12, 2015

Tips for Halloween Contact Lens Safety

Halloween contact lens safety should not be taken lightly when it comes to decorative contact lenses. Decorative contacts or “fashion” contacts can really be fun as part of your costume since they let you change your eye color and even look “spooky’ or “devilish”-but they don’t correct vision. Because they don’t correct vision, people sometimes tend to treat their use casually rather than as the medical devices that they are.


Facts & Tips for Halloween Contact Lens Eye Safety
  • Decorative contact lenses are not cosmetics or “over the counter” merchandise. They are medical devices regulated by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Places that advertise them as cosmetics or sell them without a prescription are breaking the law.
  • They are not “one size fits all.” An eye doctor, either an optometrist or an ophthalmologist, must measure each eye to properly fit the lenses and evaluate how your eye responds to contact lens wear. A poor fit can cause serious eye damage, including;
  1. a scratched cornea
  2. a corneal infection
  3. pink eye conjunctivitis
  4. decreased vision
  5. blindness
  • Places that sell decorative lenses without a prescription may give you few or no instructions on how to clean and care for your lenses. Failure to use the proper solution and care regimen to keep contact lenses clean and moist can lead to infections.
  • Where NOT to Buy Decorative Contact Lenses
  1. street vendors
  2. salons or beauty supply stores
  3. boutiques
  4. flea markets
  5. novelty stores
  6. Halloween stores
  7. record or video stores
  8. convenience stores
  9. beach shops
  10. Internet (unless the site requires a prescription)
These are not authorized distributors of contact lenses, which are prescription devices by federal law.


How to Buy Decorative Contact Lenses Safely. Get an eye exam from a licensed eye doctor, either an ophthalmologist or optometrist, even if you feel your vision is perfect to make sure your eyes are healthy enough to wear contacts. Get a valid prescription that includes the brand name, lens measurements, and an expiration date. But don’t expect your eye doctor to prescribe anime, or circle, lenses. These bigger-than-normal lenses that give the wearer a wide-eyed, doll-like look have not been approved by FDA. Buy the lenses from a seller that requires you to provide a prescription, whether you go in person or shop online. Follow directions for cleaning, disinfecting, and wearing the lenses, and visit your eye doctor for follow-up eye exams. See your eye doctor right away if you have signs of possible eye infection including:
  1. redness
  2. eye pain that doesn’t go away after a short time
  3. decrease in vision
The safe and effective use of contact lenses-whether decorative or not-requires proper fitting and education about their care to prevent the potential for serious eye problems from becoming a reality. If you or someone you know wishes to learn more or be fit with any type of contact lenses-including decorative contacts-please schedule an eye exam at Alabama Eye & Cataract Center in Birmingham by calling 205-930-0930, visiting Alabama Eye & Cataract CenterGoogle+ or facebook.com/michelsonlaservision.

Alabama Eye & Cataract Center in Birmingham is located at UAB-Highlands, 1201 11th Avenue S, Suite 501, Birmingham, Alabama 35205 and staffed by UAB Medicine affiliated ophthalmologists Marc Michelson, M.D. and Tyler Hall, M.D.

Sunday, October 4, 2015

Does a Mediterranean Diet Help Dry Eye?

The risk of developing many health problems including cardiovascular disease, cancer, Parkinson’s Disease and Alzheimer’s Disease have been shown to be reduced by eating a traditional Mediterranean diet. Certain diet supplements such as Omega 3 Fatty Acids-which are found in the Mediterranean diet-have also been found to be helpful for dry eye symptoms and problems. The question that has been asked is whether simply eating a Mediterranean diet can help dry eyes.

Research on Eating a Mediterranean Diet & Dry Eye
Researchers reporting in the journal Cornea, tried to determine whether eating a Mediterranean diet could provide help for dry eyes. They had patients fill out the Block Food Frequency Questionnaire and the Dry Eye Questionnaire and then evaluated the quality and quantity of the tear film along with the blood level of Vitamin D for each patient. The final results suggested that eating a Mediterranean diet was not associated with an improvement in dry eye symptoms and complaints but higher vitamin D levels had a small but favorable effect on dry eye syndrome symptoms.

So, while the Mediterranean diet itself doesn’t directly reduce dry eye symptoms, it does seem to be an eating plan that can help promote health and prevent disease for your whole family.

If you or someone you know suffers from dry eyes or needs help for dry eye symptoms please schedule an eye examination at Alabama Eye & Cataract Center in Birmingham by calling 205-930-0930, visiting Alabama Eye & Cataract Center , Google+ or www.facebook.com/michelsonlaservision.


Alabama Eye & Cataract Center is located at UAB-Highlands, 1201 11th Avenue S, Suite 501, Birmingham, Alabama 35205 and staffed by UAB Medicine Corneal Specialists Marc Michelson, M.D. and Tyler Hall, M.D.