Friday, November 27, 2020

Eva Shares Her Cataract Story

"I have been seeing Dr. Marc Michelson for eye care for about 35 years. Dr Michelson provided me with good vision when neither glasses nor contacts would work. He corrected my nearsightedness with refractive surgeries before the LASIK procedure was approved by the FDA and I was one of his patients in his study for FDA approval of the procedure. The result of his efforts have been nothing short of miraculous for me. I went from struggling as a trainee in a profession that required a tremendous amount of reading and visual observation to reaching each goal efficiently and having a successful career. More recently, I have required cataract surgery. Dr Michelson performed cataract surgery in my left eye yesterday. As usual the results are amazing. My next day post-surgery recheck this morning revealed that I had 20/30 vision and it is expected to improve significantly more in the next few weeks. I did feel pressure on my eye, but no pain, during the procedure. I will have Dr. Michelson take care of the cataract in my other eye without hesitation. I cannot say enough good things about Alabama Eye and Cataract Center. The nurses assistants and office staff are excellent.”-Eva 

If you or some you know is experiencing cataract symptoms such as cloudy foggy vision, glare or difficult night driving and would like to learn more about cataract surgery & lens implants please call Alabama Eye & Cataract Center in Birmingham at 205-930-0930, visit Alabama Eye & Cataract Center or www.facebook.com/alabamaeyecataractcenter

Alabama Eye & Cataract Center, P.C. leading eye care center in Birmingham located at UAB-Highlands, 1201 11th Avenue S, Suite 501, Birmingham, Alabama 35205 and staffed by UAB Medicine eye doctors and eye specialists.

Sunday, November 15, 2020

Preventing Vision Loss From Diabetes

 

Diabetes is the leading cause of new cases of blindness in adults. This is a growing problem as the number of people living with diabetes increases, so does the number of people with impaired vision. Diabetes can cause a disease of the eye called diabetic retinopathy (DR). In its early stages, you may not notice any symptoms or changes to your eyesight, and you cannot tell that this condition is damaging your eyes. If it is not detected and treated in a timely manner, your vision can be damaged permanently. A recent study, conducted at Centers for Disease Control found that the prevalence of diabetic retinopathy was high, affecting almost one-third of adults over age 40 years with diabetes, and more than one-third of African-Americans and Mexican Americans.

If you or someone you know has diabetes there are important steps you can take to prevent vision loss including a) maintain good control of your blood sugar and blood pressure with diet, exercise and medications prescribed by your physician, b) having regular eye exams as recommended by your eye doctor. Depending on how long you have had diabetes and the health of your retina, your eye doctor may recommend specialized testing including scans and pictures in order to monitor changes that occur from diabetic retinopathy. Be sure to follow up on appointments and testing.

The key to preventing vision loss from diabetes and diabetic retinopathy is early detection, diagnosis and treatment if necessary. If you or someone you know has diabetes and not had a recent eye exam please schedule an appointment at Alabama Eye & Cataract Center in Birmingham at 205-930-0930, visit Alabama Eye & Cataract Center or www.facebook.com/alabamaeyecataractcenter.

Alabama Eye & Cataract Center is a leading eye care center in Birmingham located at UAB-Highlands, 1201 11th Avenue S, Suite 501, Birmingham, Alabama 35205 and staffed by UAB Medicine eye doctors and eye specialists.

Sunday, November 8, 2020

Glaucoma & Risk of Falling from Visual Field Damage

 


The visual field loss resulting from the progression of glaucoma can pose a risk of falling to patients. Falling and the fear of falling (FoF) is a significant risk to patients-especially seniors. Researchers were interested in finding out more about how and when patients with visual field damage from glaucoma were at risk of falling and thus reported on a study in the American Journal of Ophthalmology in which they investigated where glaucoma patients most often fall and how integrated visual field (IVF) damage affects falls rates per year (falls/year) and per step (falls/step) at and away from home.

Their research conclusions for this glaucoma population suggested that a) most falls occurred at home, b) the risk of any step resulting in a fall was higher at home and c) those with greater visual field damage were more likely to fall for each step taken both at and away from home. Based on this, it is important to consider making efforts such as home environmental modification to prevent falls while maintaining physical activity.

If you are someone you know has glaucoma and has questions about risks, safety or has not had a recent eye exam please schedule an appointment at Alabama Eye & Cataract Center in Birmingham at 205-930-0930, visit Alabama Eye & Cataract Center or www.facebook.com/alabamaeyecataractcenter

Alabama Eye & Cataract Center is a leading eye care center in Birmingham located at UAB-Highlands, 1201 11th Avenue S, Suite 501, Birmingham, Alabama 35205 and staffed by UAB Medicine eye doctors and eye specialists.

Sunday, October 25, 2020

Phillip Shares His LASIK Thoughts

"First, I want to humbly thank our lord and savior for blessing Dr. Michelson and his staff with the knowledge and skills to do what they do! I did a lot ... and I mean a LOT ... of research and contemplating on where I would even consider having this surgery done at, but eventually I started comparing everyone else to Dr. Michelson. So, with all of the research and information that I had gathered up, I had almost certainly made up my mind. I decided to ask my eye doctor back home, just who he would recommend, if I ever had the thought of having LASIK done. He instantly said that he wouldn’t trust anyone else other than Dr. Michelson at UAB Highlands. So, I met with Dr. Michelson and was a candidate. I trusted him to perform my LASIK on 10/4/18 and as of today I have 20/20 vision! I honestly cannot find the words to thank him enough!

He performed my surgery at 9am and not only did he make sure that I was comfortable during the surgery and as I was leaving his office, but he personally called me the same night around 8pm! He called to check and see how I was doing! I have never had a doctor or surgeon take their own personal time to call me, just to make sure that I was doing ok. Secondly, the staff are beyond AWESOME! I never once felt pressured to sign my name on anything, have something scheduled, or feel like I was being forced into doing the surgery simply because I had walked through the doors.

Last, but not definitely not least .... Teri! She made me feel totally comfortable during a rather nerve racking time. She was there from my initial screening just to see if I was a candidate, to the day of the procedure, to the follow up and so on, she has been simply amazing! You will not find anyone more caring and professional. Thank you, Teri!

Dr. Michelson and his staff are second to none. Again, I cannot recommend them enough!

From the bottom of my heart, I want to thank everyone at Michelson Laser Vision. You guys gave me 20/20 vision and I will now be able to see my new born son grow up, without the constant struggle to see! I promise you that if you’re thinking about possibly having LASIK done, give Dr. Michelson a call! Believe me, I did all of the research and can’t stress it anymore. Please do yourself a favor and go to the absolute best ! You will be so thankful that you did 🤘🏻”

If you or some you know is tired of the hassle of glasses or contact lenses for seeing at distance and would like to find out if LASIK might be a good vision correction option, please call Michelson Laser Vision, Inc. in Birmingham at 205-969-8100, visit Michelson Laser Vision, or www.facebook.com/michelsonlaservision.

Michelson Laser Vision, Inc. is a leading LASIK center in Birmingham located at UAB-Highlands, 1201 11th Avenue S, Suite 501, Birmingham, Alabama 35205 and staffed by UAB Medicine eye doctors and eye specialists.

Sunday, October 11, 2020

How Common is Dry Eye Disease?

 


Dry eye disease (DED) is a multi-factorial ocular surface disease characterized by symptoms of dryness, grittiness, discomfort, irritation, and often visual disturbance. DED can create significant burdens on patients, including problems in social settings, occupational functioning, and reduced quality of life. Known risk factors for DED include female sex, increasing age, and certain systemic health conditions (i.e. autoimmune diseases), and a wide range of medications that are known to result in dry eyes. It is estimated that some 5% to 34% of individuals over 50 suffer from dry eyes depending on the definition of dry eye used to prepare the estimate.

If you or someone you know suffers from dry eyes and has not had a recent eye exam please schedule an appointment at Alabama Eye & Cataract Center in Birmingham at 205-930-0930, visit Alabama Eye & Cataract Center or www.facebook.com/alabamaeyecataractcenter

Alabama Eye & Cataract Center is a leading eye care center in Birmingham located at UAB-Highlands, 1201 11th Avenue S, Suite 501, Birmingham, Alabama 35205 and staffed by UAB Medicine eye doctors and eye specialists.

Thursday, October 8, 2020

Common Causes of Eyelash Loss

 


Eyelashes are more than just a cosmetic fringe! Lashes protect the eye from debris that can obstruct vision or cause infection or injury. Eyelashes grow, fall out and replace themselves in a natural cycle every six to 10 weeks, just like the hair on top of your head. While it’s normal to lose between one and five eyelashes each day, a more rapid lash loss-called “madarosis”-can be a symptom of an underlying health problem in the eye or in another part of the body.

There are many reasons people can lose more lashes than average. If you’re not also losing hair from the eyebrows or scalp, eyelash loss may signal:

  • Irritation from Cosmetics. Leaving eye makeup on too long, using and removing lash extensions and using eyelash curlers, whether heated or non-heated, can all harm lashes and speed up shedding. Eyelash loss can also stem from allergies to mascara and from glue used to apply eyelash extensions.
  • Blepharitis. Itchiness or burning accompanied by redness or swelling of the lids may indicate blepharitis. This is a condition that happens when clogged oil glands near the base of the eyelashes cause chronic inflammation and problems in the eyelash follicles.
  • Trichotillomania. This is a condition where stress or other emotional or psychological distress causes a person to pull out their own eyelashes habitually.
  • Skin Cancer. More rarely, localized lash loss can be a symptom of a skin cancer on the eyelid. Cancer can interrupt eyelash growth as harmful cells spread.

If you or someone you know experiences an abnormal amount of eyelash loss, please schedule an eye exam at Alabama Eye & Cataract Center in Birmingham at 205-930-0930, visit Alabama Eye & Cataract Center or www.facebook.com/alabamaeyecataractcenter.

Alabama Eye & Cataract Center is a leading eye care center in Birmingham located at UAB-Highlands, 1201 11th Avenue S, Suite 501, Birmingham, Alabama 35205 and staffed by UAB Medicine eye doctors and eye specialists.

Saturday, September 19, 2020

Ethnicity Increases Eye Disease Risk

 


While it may be widely known that the risk of vision loss increases with age, you may be less aware that one’s ancestry and ethnicity can play a significant role in increasing odds.

Researchers reporting in the journal Ophthalmology reported a link between African ancestry in Latino-Americans and increased intraocular pressure, a major risk factor for the eye disease glaucoma. This is one of the latest examples of a growing body of research showing that certain minority groups are at greater risk for serious eye conditions that can cause vision loss and blindness if left untreated. As a reminder, Americans of African, Latino and Asian heritage need to be aware of their increased risk for eye diseases. It is sharing information about eye disease among these ethnic groups to encourage people of these backgrounds to take early steps to protect their sight.

Many eye diseases may have no apparent symptoms in their early stages. Signs can remain hidden unless detected through a dilated eye exam. These exams are the best way to detect eye diseases so they can be treated early to help prevent vision loss.

If you or someone you know is of African, Latino and Asian ancestry and concerned about their risk of eye disease, please schedule and eye exam with eye doctors at Alabama Eye & Cataract Center in Birmingham at 205-930-0930, visit Alabama Eye & Cataract Center or www.facebook.com/alabamaeycataractcenter

Alabama Eye & Cataract Center is a leading eye care center in Birmingham located at UAB-Highlands, 1201 11th Avenue S, Suite 501, Birmingham, Alabama 35205 and staffed by UAB Medicine eye doctors and eye specialists.

Tuesday, September 1, 2020

Causes of Night Vision Problems

 


It’s no surprise that most people don’t see well in the dark. However, some people have considerable difficulty seeing at night or in poor light. This is called “night blindness” or nyctalopia. Night blindness doesn’t mean you are completely unable to see at night, but that your vision is poorer then. It is not a disease in itself, but instead is a symptom of some other type of vision problem. Certain cells in the eye’s retina are responsible for allowing you to see in dim light. If these cells are affected by a disease or condition, night blindness occurs.

Some of the eye conditions that can cause night blindness include:

If you or someone you know has difficulty seeing at night-especially if it seems to be getting worse-please schedule an eye exam with eye doctors at Alabama Eye & Cataract Center in Birmingham at 205-930-0930, visit Alabama Eye & Cataract Center or www.facebook.com/alabamaeyecataractcenter.

Alabama Eye & Cataract Center is a leading eye care center in Birmingham located at UAB-Highlands, 1201 11th Avenue S, Suite 501, Birmingham, Alabama 35205 and staffed by UAB Medicine eye doctors and eye specialists.

Tuesday, August 25, 2020

Right Choice for LASIK

“What a great experience and outcome! I have been wearing glasses for over well over forty years with a terrible astigmatism. Dr Michelson has me seeing 20/20. His staff has been great, especially Teri. I chose Dr. Michelson after a recommendation from my Ophthalmologist and my research. This was definitely the right choice for me. It really is life changing.”-Greg

If you or some you know is tired of the hassle of glasses or contact lenses for seeing at distance and would like to find out if LASIK might be a good vision correction option, please call Michelson Laser Vision, Inc. in Birmingham at 205-969-8100, visit Michelson Laser Vision, or www.facebook.com/michelsonlaservision.

Michelson Laser Vision, Inc. is a leading LASIK center in Birmingham located at UAB-Highlands, 1201 11th Avenue S, Suite 501, Birmingham, Alabama 35205 and staffed by UAB Medicine eye doctors and eye specialists.

Monday, August 17, 2020

Seven Myths Regarding Children's Eyes

 

Seven Myths Regarding Children's Eyes

#1 Pink eye only happens in young children. While young kids are known for getting pink eye, due to close contact in day care centers, so can teenagers, college students, and adults-especially those who don’t clean their contacts. The best way to keep pink eye from spreading is to practice good hygiene, including washing your hands, not touching your eyes, and using clean towels and other products around the face.

#2 Antibiotics are necessary to cure your child’s pink eye. Antibiotics are rarely necessary to treat pink eye. There are three types of pink eye: Viral, Bacterial & Allergic Conjunctivitis. Most cases are caused by viral infections or allergies and do not respond to antibiotics. Antibiotics may be prescribed for bacterial conjunctivitis depending on severity. Mild cases of bacterial conjunctivitis usually resolve on their own within 7 to 14 days without treatment.

#3 Sun is bad for your eyes. While it’s true that long-term exposure to the sun without proper protection can increase the risk of eye disease, some studies suggest sun exposure is necessary for normal visual development. Children who have less sun exposure seem to be at higher risk for developing myopia or nearsightedness. Just make sure they’re protected with UV-blocking sunglasses and sunscreen.

#4 Blue light from screens is damaging children’s vision. Contrary to what you may be reading on the internet, blue light is not blinding you or your screen-obsessed kids. While it is true that nearsightedness is becoming more common, blue light isn’t the culprit. In fact, we are exposed to much more blue light naturally from the sun than we are from our screens. The important thing to remember is to take frequent breaks. Use the 20-20-20 rule: look at an object at least 20 feet away every 20 minutes for at least 20 seconds.

#5 Vision loss only happens to adults. The eyes of a child with amblyopia (lazy eye) may look normal, but this eye condition can steal sight if not treated. Amblyopia is when vision in one of the child’s eyes is reduced because the eye and brain are not working together properly. Strabismus (crossed eyes) is another eye condition that can cause vision loss in a child. Strabismus is when the eyes do not line up in the same direction when focusing on an object.

#6 All farsighted children need glasses. Most children are farsighted early in life. It’s actually normal. It doesn’t necessarily mean your child needs glasses because they use their focusing muscles to provide clear vision for both distance and near vision. Children do need glasses when their farsightedness blurs their vision or leads to strabismus. They will also need glasses if they are significantly more farsighted in one eye compared with the other, a condition that puts them at risk of developing amblyopia.

#7 There is no difference between a vision screening and a vision exam. While it’s true that your child’s eyes should be checked regularly, a less invasive vision screening by a pediatrician, family doctor, ophthalmologist, optometrist, orthoptist, or person trained in vision assessment of preschool children is adequate for most children. If the screening detects a problem, the child may need to see an ophthalmologist or other eye care professional. A comprehensive exam involves the use of eye drops to dilate the pupil, enabling a more thorough investigation of the overall health of the eye and visual system.

If your child has not had a recent eye exam please schedule an appointment at Alabama Eye & Cataract Center in Birmingham at 205-930-0930, visit Alabama Eye & Cataract Center or www.facebook.com/alabamaeyecataractcenter.

Alabama Eye & Cataract Center is a leading eye care center in Birmingham located at UAB-Highlands, 1201 11th Avenue S, Suite 501, Birmingham, Alabama 35205 and staffed by UAB Medicine eye doctors and eye specialists.

Monday, August 10, 2020

Contact Lenses for Itchy Eyes

 

Eye allergies and itchy eyes are quite common. Many prescription and over the counter eye drops are helpful for symptomatic relief of itchy eyes on a temporary basis. Typically allergy sufferers must remove their contact lenses and even discontinue them during the peak seasonal allergy periods. Recently, a study was undertaken to determine the possibility of using a contact lens as a drug delivery system for eye allergy medication. The study was reported in the Cornea Journal in which etafilcon A (Acuvue 2) contact lenses were loaded with ketotifen-an antihistamine-to determine whether itchy eye relief could be achieved while correcting vision. The study concluded that effective ocular allergy treatment could be achieved with this antihistamine-contact lens delivery system and offers potential for contact lens wearers suffering from ocular allergies.

If you are someone you know has not had a recent eye exam please schedule an appointment at Alabama Eye & Cataract Center in Birmingham at 205-930-0930, visit Alabama Eye & Cataract Center or www.facebook.com/alabamaeyecataractcenter.

Alabama Eye & Cataract Center is a leading eye care center in Birmingham located at UAB-Highlands, 1201 11th Avenue S, Suite 501, Birmingham, Alabama 35205 and staffed by UAB Medicine eye doctors and eye specialists.

Monday, July 27, 2020

Great Cataract Surgery Experience


“Super! Great! Wonderful! All of the superlative’s. Thanks”-Don Siegelman


If you or some you know is experiencing cataract symptoms such as cloudy foggy vision, glare or difficult night driving and would like to learn more about cataract surgery & lens implants please call Alabama Eye & Cataract Center in Birmingham at 205-930-0930, visit Alabama Eye & Cataract Center or www.facebook.com/alabamaeyecataractcenter.

Alabama Eye & Cataract Center, P.C. leading eye care center in Birmingham located at UAB-Highlands, 1201 11th Avenue S, Suite 501, Birmingham, Alabama 35205 and staffed by UAB Medicine eye doctors and eye specialists.

Monday, July 13, 2020

About Plaquenil, Your Retina & Side Effects




Plaquenil is a medication that was originally used to prevent or treat malaria, a serious but rare disease caused by bites from infected mosquitoes. It turns out that this drug is helpful in treating inflammatory diseases such as certain types of inflammatory disease. Inflammatory disease occurs when the body's immune system attacks its own healthy tissue. Some diseases treated with Plaquenil include:
  • Lupus, which causes fever, rashes, skin problems, and other symptoms.
  • Rheumatoid Arthritis, a condition that causes pain and swelling in the joints of your hands and feet.
  • Sjorgren’s Syndrome, which causes dry eyes and dry mouth.
Plaquenil lowers your immune system’s ability to cause inflammation. This can help control symptoms like rashes, skin and mouth sores and joint pain. However, Plaquenil has side effects that can affect your eyes. A rare side effect of Plaquenil is damage to the eye's retina, which is the light-sensitive tissue at the back of the eye. Using Plaquenil for a long period of time may harm the retina, causing serious vision loss. People with retinal damage from Plaquenil are not aware at first that they are losing vision. Unfortunately, once they lose a severe amount of vision loss, it is permanent.

If you take Plaquenil, it is very important to see an eye doctor who can examine your retina and provide any other testing and imaging, to check your retina for problems before serious damage occurs. Please schedule an eye exam with eye doctors at Alabama Eye & Cataract Center in Birmingham at 205-930-0930, visit Alabama Eye & Cataract Center or www.facebook.com/alabamaeyecataractcenter.

If you are someone you know has not had a recent eye exam, please schedule an appointment at Alabama Eye & Cataract Center, a leading eye care center in Birmingham located at UAB-Highlands, 1201 11th Avenue S, Suite 501, Birmingham, Alabama 35205 and staffed by UAB Medicine eye doctors and eye specialists.

Monday, July 6, 2020

Fireworks Eye Injuries



The most recent Consumer Product Safety Commission report found that 14% of fireworks injuries were eye injuries. In the most severe cases, fireworks can rupture the globe of the eye, cause chemical and thermal burns, corneal abrasions and retinal detachment -all of which can cause permanent eye damage and vision loss. Children and young adults are frequent victims. Children age 15 and under accounted for 36% of the total injuries, according to the commission's report. And half of the injuries requiring an emergency room visit were to people age 20 or younger. Even sparklers can be dangerous, as they burn at more than 2,000 degrees Fahrenheit. Sparklers were responsible for 1,200 of the injuries in the latest report, and a sparkler mishap caused one of the fireworks deaths reported in 2017. The people injured by fireworks aren't necessarily handling the explosives themselves. In fact, 65% of people injured by fireworks were bystanders, according to another study. The statistics don't lie. Children and people not handling fireworks themselves are in as much danger as the people actually lighting fireworks.

Please leave preparing fireworks displays to professionals in order to decrease your risk of fireworks eye injuries. If you or someone you know does experience a fireworks eye injury call us immediately or go directly to the emergency room and have them call us for consultation.

Monday, June 29, 2020

About Eyelid Twitches


If you have ever had an eyelid twitch for an extended period of time, you know how annoying it is. An eyelid twitch (or tic) is when you have a spasm or slight movement of your upper or lower eyelid. It comes on suddenly, and can last for a minute, hours, days or even longer. While it may feel as if everyone can see the twitch, most twitches are slight enough that they can’t be seen by someone simply looking at your face. Most common eyelid twitches are harmless, and do not affect your vision. However, there are some neurological problems that can make eyelid muscles contract, such as blepharospasm and hemifacial spasm. These less common conditions generally tend to cause the eyelids to close more fully and for longer periods of time, limiting or completely blocking vision. Other muscles in the face may be affected as well. For the majority of us, the common eyelid twitch is a brief and minor annoyance. But when it lasts longer or occurs more frequently than usual, there are some steps you can take to make it go away:

Get Some Sleep!

Eyelid twitches often happen to people when they are overly tired. Get some restorative sleep.

Step Back From Stress!

Being under stress can lead to a twitch. If you can’t eliminate something causing you stress, find stress-reducing activities to help get rid of the twitch.

Cut Back On Caffeine!

As a stimulant, caffeine can cause eyelid spasms. Limiting your coffee, tea or soda intake may help to reduce eyelid twitching.

Moisturize Your Eyes!

In some cases, having irritated or dry eyes can lead to eyelid spasms. Get a dry eye exam if necessary or if you are bothered by dry eye problems.

If you or someone you know has ongoing eyelid twitching and gritty, uncomfortable eyes please schedule an eye exam at Alabama Eye & Cataract Center in Birmingham at 205-930-0930, visit Alabama Eye & Cataract Center or https://www.facebook.com/AlabamaEyeCataractCenter/.

Alabama Eye & Cataract Center is a leading eye care center in Birmingham located at UAB-Highlands, 1201 11th Avenue S, Suite 501, Birmingham, Alabama 35205 and staffed by UAB Medicine eye doctors and eye specialists.

Monday, June 22, 2020

About Diabetes & Diabetic Eye Disease





What Is Diabetes?
Diabetes is a disease that affects the body’s ability to produce or use insulin effectively to control blood sugar (glucose) levels. Too much glucose in the blood for a long time can cause damage in many parts of the body. Diabetes can damage the heart, kidneys and blood vessels. It damages small blood vessels in the eye as well. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) says that about 90% of vision loss from diabetes can be prevented. BUT-Early detection of diabetic eye disease is the key! People with diabetes should get critical, annual eye exams even before they have signs of vision loss. Studies show that sixty percent of diabetics are not getting the exams their doctors recommend.

What Is Diabetic Eye Disease?
Diabetic eye disease is a term for several eye problems that can all result from diabetes. Diabetic eye disease includes: 
  • diabetic retinopathy,
  • diabetic macular edema,
  • cataract, and
  • glaucoma.
Diabetic Retinopathy
Diabetic retinopathy is when blood vessels in the retina swell, leak or close off completely. Abnormal new blood vessels can also grow on the surface of the retina.
People who have diabetes or poor blood sugar control are at risk for diabetic retinopathy. The risk of developing diabetic retinopathy increases the longer you have diabetes.

Diabetic Macular Edema
Macular edema happens when fluid builds up on the retina and causes swelling and blurry vision. Diabetes can cause macular edema. Diabetic macular edema can lead to permanent vision loss.

Diabetes and Cataracts
Excess blood sugar from diabetes can causes cataracts. You may need cataract surgery to remove lenses that are clouded by the effects of diabetes. Maintaining good control of your blood sugar helps prevent permanent clouding of the lens and surgery.

Diabetes and Glaucoma
Glaucoma is a group of diseases that cause damage to your eye's optic nerve. This damage leads to irreversible loss of vision. Having diabetes doubles your chance of getting glaucoma.

Other Eye Problems Can Be Related to Diabetes!
Diabetes can cause vision problems even if you do not have a form of diabetic eye disease.
If your blood sugar levels change quickly, it can affect the shape of your eye’s lens, causing blurry vision. Your vision goes back to normal after your blood sugar stabilizes. Have your blood sugar controlled before getting your eyeglasses prescription checked. This ensures you receive the correct prescription.

Tuesday, June 9, 2020

Senior Vision Changes after 60

As we age, even people who do not have age-related eye diseases and who have good visual acuity may experience vision changes or notice changes in the way their eyes function. A common change is that your eyes may take longer to adjust and focus or don’t adjust very well when moving from well lit to dimly lit area. This change in dark and light adaptation can make driving more difficult, especially at night or in the rain. Driving may be even more challenging for people with eye diseases that reduce their peripheral (side) vision such as glaucoma or increase their sensitivity to glare including cataracts. To be on the safe side, the National Traffic Safety Administration recommends that elders take a driving course designed specifically for seniors, drive during daylight hours, reduce speed and be extra-cautious at intersections. Another common senior vision change can be an increased difficulty in distinguishing an image from its background-particularly when subtle gradations of tone are involved. This is called “contrast sensitivity” and can also make driving in dim lighting more of a challenge.

If you or someone you know is over 60, it is important to have regular eye health and vision exams and for you to share any subtle difficulties with your vision so that we can help prevent eye problems and preserve your vision. Schedule a senior eye exam at Alabama Eye & Cataract Center in Birmingham at 205-930-0930, visit Alabama Eye & Cataract Center or www.facebook.com/alabamaeyecataractcenter.

Thursday, June 4, 2020

Christmas Plants Treat Eye Tumors?


German researchers reporting in Science Signaling have identified a compound in the berries of the Coralberry plant that appears to be able to destroy Uveal Melanoma, the most common and an aggressive type of eye cancer. The Coralberry is a very common plant we use for Christmas and holiday decorations! The leaves of the plant contain bacteria that produce a toxin that inhibits a cancer cell molecule called Gq protein and thus is destructive to the cancer. It also appears that the toxin may be effective against skin cancer as well. At this time the investigation is still in the laboratory but researchers hope to make it into a pharmaceutical in the near future.

If you notice pigmented or non pigmented lesions or dry scaly patches on your eyelids or around your eyes please let us know at your eye exam. Schedule routine eye exams with us at Alabama Eye & Cataract Center in Birmingham at 205-930-0930, visit Alabama Eye & Cataract Center or www.facebook.com/alabamaeyeandcataractcenter.

Alabama Eye & Cataract Center is a leading eye care center in Birmingham located at UAB-Highlands, 1201 11th Avenue S, Suite 501, Birmingham, Alabama 35205 and staffed by UAB Medicine eye doctors and eye specialists.