Monday, July 6, 2020

Fireworks Eye Injuries



The most recent Consumer Product Safety Commission report found that 14% of fireworks injuries were eye injuries. In the most severe cases, fireworks can rupture the globe of the eye, cause chemical and thermal burns, corneal abrasions and retinal detachment -all of which can cause permanent eye damage and vision loss. Children and young adults are frequent victims. Children age 15 and under accounted for 36% of the total injuries, according to the commission's report. And half of the injuries requiring an emergency room visit were to people age 20 or younger. Even sparklers can be dangerous, as they burn at more than 2,000 degrees Fahrenheit. Sparklers were responsible for 1,200 of the injuries in the latest report, and a sparkler mishap caused one of the fireworks deaths reported in 2017. The people injured by fireworks aren't necessarily handling the explosives themselves. In fact, 65% of people injured by fireworks were bystanders, according to another study. The statistics don't lie. Children and people not handling fireworks themselves are in as much danger as the people actually lighting fireworks.

Please leave preparing fireworks displays to professionals in order to decrease your risk of fireworks eye injuries. If you or someone you know does experience a fireworks eye injury call us immediately or go directly to the emergency room and have them call us for consultation.

Monday, June 29, 2020

About Eyelid Twitches


If you have ever had an eyelid twitch for an extended period of time, you know how annoying it is. An eyelid twitch (or tic) is when you have a spasm or slight movement of your upper or lower eyelid. It comes on suddenly, and can last for a minute, hours, days or even longer. While it may feel as if everyone can see the twitch, most twitches are slight enough that they can’t be seen by someone simply looking at your face. Most common eyelid twitches are harmless, and do not affect your vision. However, there are some neurological problems that can make eyelid muscles contract, such as blepharospasm and hemifacial spasm. These less common conditions generally tend to cause the eyelids to close more fully and for longer periods of time, limiting or completely blocking vision. Other muscles in the face may be affected as well. For the majority of us, the common eyelid twitch is a brief and minor annoyance. But when it lasts longer or occurs more frequently than usual, there are some steps you can take to make it go away:

Get Some Sleep!

Eyelid twitches often happen to people when they are overly tired. Get some restorative sleep.

Step Back From Stress!

Being under stress can lead to a twitch. If you can’t eliminate something causing you stress, find stress-reducing activities to help get rid of the twitch.

Cut Back On Caffeine!

As a stimulant, caffeine can cause eyelid spasms. Limiting your coffee, tea or soda intake may help to reduce eyelid twitching.

Moisturize Your Eyes!

In some cases, having irritated or dry eyes can lead to eyelid spasms. Get a dry eye exam if necessary or if you are bothered by dry eye problems.

If you or someone you know has ongoing eyelid twitching and gritty, uncomfortable eyes please schedule an eye exam at Alabama Eye & Cataract Center in Birmingham at 205-930-0930, visit Alabama Eye & Cataract Center or https://www.facebook.com/AlabamaEyeCataractCenter/.

Alabama Eye & Cataract Center is a leading eye care center in Birmingham located at UAB-Highlands, 1201 11th Avenue S, Suite 501, Birmingham, Alabama 35205 and staffed by UAB Medicine eye doctors and eye specialists.

Monday, June 22, 2020

About Diabetes & Diabetic Eye Disease





What Is Diabetes?
Diabetes is a disease that affects the body’s ability to produce or use insulin effectively to control blood sugar (glucose) levels. Too much glucose in the blood for a long time can cause damage in many parts of the body. Diabetes can damage the heart, kidneys and blood vessels. It damages small blood vessels in the eye as well. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) says that about 90% of vision loss from diabetes can be prevented. BUT-Early detection of diabetic eye disease is the key! People with diabetes should get critical, annual eye exams even before they have signs of vision loss. Studies show that sixty percent of diabetics are not getting the exams their doctors recommend.

What Is Diabetic Eye Disease?
Diabetic eye disease is a term for several eye problems that can all result from diabetes. Diabetic eye disease includes: 
  • diabetic retinopathy,
  • diabetic macular edema,
  • cataract, and
  • glaucoma.
Diabetic Retinopathy
Diabetic retinopathy is when blood vessels in the retina swell, leak or close off completely. Abnormal new blood vessels can also grow on the surface of the retina.
People who have diabetes or poor blood sugar control are at risk for diabetic retinopathy. The risk of developing diabetic retinopathy increases the longer you have diabetes.

Diabetic Macular Edema
Macular edema happens when fluid builds up on the retina and causes swelling and blurry vision. Diabetes can cause macular edema. Diabetic macular edema can lead to permanent vision loss.

Diabetes and Cataracts
Excess blood sugar from diabetes can causes cataracts. You may need cataract surgery to remove lenses that are clouded by the effects of diabetes. Maintaining good control of your blood sugar helps prevent permanent clouding of the lens and surgery.

Diabetes and Glaucoma
Glaucoma is a group of diseases that cause damage to your eye's optic nerve. This damage leads to irreversible loss of vision. Having diabetes doubles your chance of getting glaucoma.

Other Eye Problems Can Be Related to Diabetes!
Diabetes can cause vision problems even if you do not have a form of diabetic eye disease.
If your blood sugar levels change quickly, it can affect the shape of your eye’s lens, causing blurry vision. Your vision goes back to normal after your blood sugar stabilizes. Have your blood sugar controlled before getting your eyeglasses prescription checked. This ensures you receive the correct prescription.

Tuesday, June 9, 2020

Senior Vision Changes after 60

As we age, even people who do not have age-related eye diseases and who have good visual acuity may experience vision changes or notice changes in the way their eyes function. A common change is that your eyes may take longer to adjust and focus or don’t adjust very well when moving from well lit to dimly lit area. This change in dark and light adaptation can make driving more difficult, especially at night or in the rain. Driving may be even more challenging for people with eye diseases that reduce their peripheral (side) vision such as glaucoma or increase their sensitivity to glare including cataracts. To be on the safe side, the National Traffic Safety Administration recommends that elders take a driving course designed specifically for seniors, drive during daylight hours, reduce speed and be extra-cautious at intersections. Another common senior vision change can be an increased difficulty in distinguishing an image from its background-particularly when subtle gradations of tone are involved. This is called “contrast sensitivity” and can also make driving in dim lighting more of a challenge.

If you or someone you know is over 60, it is important to have regular eye health and vision exams and for you to share any subtle difficulties with your vision so that we can help prevent eye problems and preserve your vision. Schedule a senior eye exam at Alabama Eye & Cataract Center in Birmingham at 205-930-0930, visit Alabama Eye & Cataract Center or www.facebook.com/alabamaeyecataractcenter.

Thursday, June 4, 2020

Christmas Plants Treat Eye Tumors?


German researchers reporting in Science Signaling have identified a compound in the berries of the Coralberry plant that appears to be able to destroy Uveal Melanoma, the most common and an aggressive type of eye cancer. The Coralberry is a very common plant we use for Christmas and holiday decorations! The leaves of the plant contain bacteria that produce a toxin that inhibits a cancer cell molecule called Gq protein and thus is destructive to the cancer. It also appears that the toxin may be effective against skin cancer as well. At this time the investigation is still in the laboratory but researchers hope to make it into a pharmaceutical in the near future.

If you notice pigmented or non pigmented lesions or dry scaly patches on your eyelids or around your eyes please let us know at your eye exam. Schedule routine eye exams with us at Alabama Eye & Cataract Center in Birmingham at 205-930-0930, visit Alabama Eye & Cataract Center or www.facebook.com/alabamaeyeandcataractcenter.

Alabama Eye & Cataract Center is a leading eye care center in Birmingham located at UAB-Highlands, 1201 11th Avenue S, Suite 501, Birmingham, Alabama 35205 and staffed by UAB Medicine eye doctors and eye specialists.

Thursday, May 21, 2020

Masks: Why Are We All Wearing One?


We know that the primary way people get infected with COVID-19 is through respiratory droplets. Respiratory droplets are released into the air when you sneeze, cough AND talk! The research tells us that face masks-even common cloth masks, surgical masks and non-fit-tested respirators, can be an effective barrier to spreading respiratory droplets. So…we are…and we ask you to…wear a mask please!

We look forward to seeing you soon for your regular eye exams for eye health & vision!
Should you need help for a contact lens irritation, red eye or contact lens problem, PLEASE CALL 205-930-0930 and we can provide you with either a TeleEyeHealth Virtual Visit & Consultation or schedule an appointment for a personal visit at Alabama Eye & Cataract Center.

Alabama Eye & Cataract Center is a leading eye care center in Birmingham located at UAB-Highlands, 1201 11th Avenue S., Suite 501, Birmingham, Alabama 35205 and staffed by UAB Medicine eye doctors and eye specialists.

Wednesday, May 13, 2020

Practical Eye Health Tips for COVID



There are some practical eye health tips and precautions that you should consider to stay safe from COVID risk. We suggest thinking about:
  • If You Wear Contact Lenses, Consider Switching to Glasses for a While. There's no evidence that wearing contact lenses increases your risk of Coronavirus infection, but if you wear contacts, you tend to touch your eyes more than average. Wearing glasses decreases the likelihood and need to touch your eyes.
  • Wearing Glasses May Add a Layer of Protection. Eyeglasses or sunglasses can shield your eyes from infected respiratory droplets in the air, but they don’t provide 100% security. The virus can still reach your eyes from the exposed sides, tops and bottoms of your glasses. If you’re caring for a sick patient or potentially exposed person, safety goggles may offer a stronger defense.
  • Stock Up on Eye Drops and Medicine Prescriptions If You Can. If possible try to stock up on critical medications and eye drops, so that you’ll have enough to get by if you are quarantined or if your pharmacy is unable to fill your refills. If your insurance allows you to get more than 1 month of essential eye medicine, such as glaucoma drops, you should do so. Some insurers will approve a 3-month supply of medication in times of natural disaster. Ask your pharmacist or our office for help if you have trouble getting approval from your insurance company. And as always, request a refill as soon as you’re due. Don’t wait until the last minute to contact your pharmacy. 
  • Avoid Rubbing Your Eyes. Everyone rubs their eyes! We all do it and it can be a tough to stop. But-doing so will lower your risk of infection. If you feel an urge to itch or rub your eye or even to adjust your glasses, use a tissue instead of your fingers. Dry eyes can lead to more rubbing, so consider adding moisturizing drops to your eye routine. If you must touch your eyes for any reason-even to administer eye medicine-wash your hands first with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. Then wash them again afterwards. 
  • We look forward to seeing you soon for your regular eye exams for eye health & vision! In the meantime if you, a friend or relative should need help for a contact lens irritation, red eye or contact lens problem, PLEASE CALL 205-930-0930 and we can provide you with either a TeleEyeHealth Virtual Visit & Consultation  or schedule an appointment for a personal visit at Alabama Eye & Cataract Center.
Visit Alabama Eye & Cataract Center or facebook.com/alabamaeyecataractcenter. Alabama Eye & Cataract Center is a leading eye care center in Birmingham located at UAB-Highlands, 1201 11th Avenue S, Suite 501, Birmingham, Alabama 35205 and staffed by UAB Medicine eye doctors and eye specialists.

Monday, May 4, 2020

COVID Eye Safety & Contact Lenses-What to Know!

COVID  Eye Safety & Contact Lenses

The traditional “best practices” for wearing contact lenses safely may not be sufficient to completely prevent COVID-19 spread, as wearing contact lenses requires a great deal of finger manipulation around the eyelids, nose and mouth in order to insert the lenses. Contact lens wearers often touch their eyes, mouth and nose, putting wearers at risk for contracting the virus. Even with the best care and hygiene the American Academy of Ophthalmology (AAO) recently published recommendations for corona virus eye safety that strongly suggested not wearing contact lenses and keeping everything away from patients’ eyes. That said, you can choose to keep wearing your contact lenses but:

  1. Wash your hands carefully and thoroughly with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, followed by hand drying with unused paper towels. This should occur before every contact lens insertion and removal. If soap and water are not readily available, use a hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol. People should avoid touching their face, including their eyes, nose and mouth, with unwashed hands.
  2. Disinfect or dispose your contact lenses as prescribed by your doctor. Either dispose of your daily disposable lenses each evening, or regularly disinfect your monthly and two-week lenses according to instructions.
  3. Discontinue lens wear if sick. Consistent with recommendations for other types of illness, those who feel ill with cold or flu-like symptoms should cease contact lens wear.

We look forward to seeing you soon for your regular eye exams for eye health & vision! In the meantime if you, a friend or relative should need help for a contact lens irritation, red eye or contact lens, PLEASE CALL 205-930-0930 and we can provide you with either a TeleEyeHealth Virtual Visit & Consultation or schedule an appointment for a personal visit at Alabama Eye & Cataract Center. Visit us at Alabama Eye & Cataract Center at our Eye Care Blog, or on Facebook.

Alabama Eye & Cataract Center is a leading eye care center in Birmingham located at UAB-Highlands, 1201 11th Avenue S, Suite 501, Birmingham, Alabama 35205 and staffed by UAB Medicine eye doctors and eye specialists.

Sunday, April 26, 2020

Pink Eye Conjunctivitis & COVID-19 Coronavirus


Pink eye, known medically as conjunctivitis is an inflammation or infection of the outer membrane of the eyeball and the inner eyelid that causes redness and irritation in and around the eyes. It can be caused by allergies or a bacterial or viral infection. Conjunctivitis can be extremely contagious and is spread by contact with eye secretions from someone who is infected. The American Academy of Ophthalmology alerted us that COVID-19 Coronavirus might cause a pink eye conjunctivitis that looks like any other viral conjunctivitis. Viral conjunctivitis is common in patients who have colds, the flu and other types of viral infection. However, our patients should keep in mind that careful evaluation of the reported information suggests that only between 1-3% of those infected with COVID-19 actually develop pink eye conjunctivitis. We are here to help!

If you, someone you know, a friend, or a relative develops eye redness and thinks they might have pink eye conjunctivitis-PLEASE CALL US-205-930-0930 and we can advise you whether to schedule a TeleEyeHealth Virtual Visit &Consultation, schedule a visit to our office where we use using socialdistancing and sanitary hygienic disinfecting procedures or even ask you to schedule a visit with your primary care physician if you also have a fever, cough or shortness of breath.

We look forward to seeing you soon for your regular eye exams for eye health & vision! In the meantime if you, a friend or relative should need help for a contact lens irritation, red eye or contact lens, PLEASE CALL 205-930-0930 and we can provide you with either a TeleEyeHealth Virtual Visit & Consultation or schedule an appointment for a personal visit at Alabama Eye & Cataract Center.

Visit us at Alabama Eye & Cataract Center, our Eye Care Blog or on FacebookAlabama Eye & Cataract Center is a leading eye care center in Birmingham located at UAB-Highlands, 1201 11th Avenue S, Suite 501, Birmingham, Alabama 35205 and staffed by UAB Medicine eye doctors and eye specialists.

Monday, April 20, 2020

TeleEyeHealth Virtual Visits for Eye Problems


TeleEyeHealth Virtual Visits

At Alabama Eye & Cataract Center we are often able to provide help for certain eye problems & conditions through the use of TeleEyeHealth Virtual Visits & Consultation without having to come to our office. TeleEyeHealth Virtual Visits use electronic & digital communications and software to provide clinical services to patients without an in-person visit. By using your home computer and webcam, or even your phone, we are able to visualize and evaluate urgent eye problems such as a minor eye accident, red eyes, eye pain, irritation, sensitivity to light, eye discharge, matter in eyes, eyelid redness, crusting, eyelids stuck together, excessive tearing, eyes burning, watering, feeling gritty, eyes itching, allergy eyes, eyelid swelling, eyelid lumps or eyelid bumps-and then help you, or if needed, schedule you to come in for an actual office visit. TeleEyeHealth Virtual Visits are covered by almost all insurance plans and help avoid an unnecessary trip to the emergency room or our office.


Tuesday, April 14, 2020

COVID Guidelines You Should Remember!


We are all dealing with the day to day issues and safety concerns created by the COVID-19 virus. As time goes on, and it appears as if we may have reached the peak, sometimes there can be a degree of relaxation of the necessary guidelines and good practices to stop the spread. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) offers these general guidelines for preventing the spread of corona virus and protecting your health:
·        Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds.
·        You should especially wash your hands before eating, after using the restroom, sneezing, coughing or blowing your nose.
·        If you can’t get to a sink, use a hand sanitizer that has at least 60% alcohol.
·        Avoid touching your face-particularly your eyes, nose, and mouth.
·        If you cough or sneeze, cover your face with your elbow or a tissue. If you use a tissue, throw it away promptly. Then go wash your hands.
·        Avoid close contact with sick people. If you think someone has a respiratory infection, it’s safest to stay 6 feet away.
·        Stay home when you are sick.
·        Regularly disinfect commonly touched surfaces and items in your house, such as doorknobs and counter tops.

We look forward to seeing you soon for your regular eye exams for eye health & vision! In the meantime if you, a friend or relative should need help for an urgent eye problem such as an eye accident, red eyes, eye pain, irritation, sensitivity to light, eye discharge, matter in eyes, eyelid redness, crusting, eyelids stuck together, excessive tearing, eyes burning, watering, feeling gritty, eyes itching, allergy eyes, eyelid swelling, eyelid lumps or eyelid bumps, PLEASE CALL 205-930-0930 and we can provide you with either a TeleEyeHealth Virtual Visit & Consultation or schedule an appointment for a personal visit at Alabama Eye & Cataract Center.

Visit Alabama Eye & Cataract Center or www.facebook.com/alabamaeyecataractcenter. Alabama Eye & Cataract Center is a leading eye care center in Birmingham located at UAB-Highlands, 1201 11th Avenue S, Suite 501, Birmingham, Alabama 35205 and staffed by UAB Medicine eye doctors and eye specialists.

Sunday, April 5, 2020

Eye Exams & Diagnosing Alzheimer’s


A recent study published by Duke University researchers in the journal Retina suggests that an observed loss of blood vessels in the retina may reflect changes in brain health and could signal Alzheimer’s disease. In people with healthy brains, microscopic blood vessels form a dense web at the back of the eye inside the retina. In the eyes of people with Alzheimer’s disease, that web was less dense and even sparse in places. The differences in density were statistically significant after researchers controlled for factors including age, sex, and level of education. The study measured blood vessels that can’t be seen during a regular eye exam using noninvasive technology that takes high-resolution images of very small blood vessels within the retina in just a few minutes, called Optical Coherence Tomography-Angiography (OCT-A). They concluded that it’s possible that these changes in blood vessel density in the retina could mirror what’s going on in the tiny blood vessels in the brain, perhaps before we are able to detect any changes in cognition. 

With nearly 6 million Americans living with Alzheimer’s disease and no viable treatments or noninvasive tools for early diagnosis, its burden on families and the economy is heavy. Scientists at have studied other changes in the retina that could signal trouble upstream in the brain, such as thinning of some of the retinal nerve layers. The goal would be to use this technology to detect Alzheimer’s early, before symptoms of memory loss are evident, and be able to monitor these changes over time in participants of clinical trials studying new Alzheimer’s treatments.

Please mention any concerns you have about Alzheimer’s during your regular eye exam. To learn more about new technology and examination techniques we are using, please just ask us at your scheduled appointment.

If you or someone you know has not had a recent eye exam please schedule an appointment at Alabama Eye & Cataract Center in Birmingham at 205-930-0930, visit Alabama Eye & Cataract Center or www.facebook.com/alabamaeyecataractcenter.

Alabama Eye & Cataract Center is a leading eye care center in Birmingham located at UAB-Highlands, 1201 11th Avenue S, Suite 501, Birmingham, Alabama 35205 and staffed by UAB Medicine eye doctors and eye specialists.

Friday, April 3, 2020

Sleep Problems & Glaucoma



A study of more than 6,700 people in the United States over age 40 who were previously diagnosed with glaucoma based on their optic nerve damage and visual field loss, responded to a survey about their sleep that revealed possible connections between glaucoma and sleep problems. Glaucoma is a disease of the optic nerve. Damage to this nerve-which is responsible for sending signals from the eye to the brain so you can see-often goes unnoticed until an eye exam reveals the nerve damage and related vision loss caused by glaucoma.
Patients were asked and responded to questions about a) amount of time slept, b) difficulties falling asleep, c) sleep disturbances specifically waking up during sleep, d) having diagnosed sleep disorders, including sleep apnea, e) use of sleep medication and f) problems with sleepiness during the day. 
The results revealed the following interesting information:
  • People who slept for 10 or more hours a night were three times more likely to have glaucoma-related optic nerve damage than those who slept 7 hours a night.
  • People who fell asleep in 9 minutes or less, or those who needed 30 minutes or more to fall asleep, were twice as likely to have glaucoma than those who took 10-29 minutes to fall asleep.
  • The odds of having missing vision were three times higher among people who got 3 or fewer or 10 or more hours of sleep per night, compared with those who got 7 hours a night.
  • People who said they had trouble remembering things because of daytime sleepiness were twice as likely to have visual field loss than those who said they were not sleepy during the day and did not notice memory problems.
  • People who said they had difficulty working on a hobby because they were sleepy during the day were three times more likely to have vision loss than people who reported no problems working on hobbies and no daytime sleepiness.
While it is unclear whether the sleep problems are a result of some glaucoma related phenomenon or perhaps whether these sleep problems might be early risk factors for glaucoma, it is important to mention to your eye doctor whether you experience sleep problems. Schedule an eye health exam beginning at age 40 at Alabama Eye & Cataract Center in Birmingham at 205-930-0930, visit Alabama Eye & Cataract Center or www.facebook.com/alabamaeyecataractcenter.

Monday, March 23, 2020

Thank You Dr. Jennifer!



“I went and to the center thinking I needed glasses and found out I had cataracts and needed surgery, I saw Dr. Jennifer Michelson for cataract surgery, it was an awesome experience. She was so nice and thorough with me, she even told me things I wouldn’t have thought to ask. I didn’t have any kind of problems thru any of the surgery, now I can see so great, I can’t hardly believe it, got 20/15 vision, better that normal. If anyone has any kind of eye problems please contact these people, everyone there is the best, I just want to thank Dr. Michelson again for everything she did for me, it was awesome experience from the eye check up thru the surgery, thank you Dr. Jennifer for everything you did.”-Darryl

If you or some you know is experiencing cataract symptoms such as cloudy foggy vision, glare or difficult night driving and would like to learn more about cataract surgery & lens implants please call Alabama Eye & Cataract Center in Birmingham at 205-930-0930, visit Alabama Eye & Cataract Center or www.facebook.com/alabamaeyecataractcenter.

Alabama Eye & Cataract Center, P.C. leading eye care center in Birmingham located at UAB-Highlands, 1201 11th Avenue S, Suite 501, Birmingham, Alabama 35205 and staffed by UAB Medicine eye doctors and eye specialists.

Monday, March 16, 2020

Heavy Smoking and Vision Loss


Researchers at Rutgers University Behavioral Health Care reported findings of a study in Psychiatry Research demonstrating that smoking more than 20 cigarettes a day can damage your vision. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that 34.3 million adults in the US currently smoke cigarettes and that more than 16 million live with a smoking-related disease, many of which affect the cardiovascular system. Cigarette smoke consists of numerous neurotoxic compounds that are harmful to health. These neurotoxic chemicals are believed to result in nerve damage to the optic nerve and retinal nerve fiber layer resulting in a loss of color vision and contrast sensitivity. This damage is in addition to the known harmful effects of smoking which doubles the risk for age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and hastens the yellowing of the crystalline lens of the eye where cataracts form.

If you or someone you know is a smoker-now is the time to quit! To learn more about eye health and smoking schedule an eye exam at If you or someone you know has not had a recent eye exam please schedule an appointment at Alabama Eye & Cataract Center in Birmingham at 205-930-0930, visit Alabama Eye & Cataract Center or www.facebook.com/alabamaeyecataractcenter.

Alabama Eye & Cataract Center is a leading eye care center in Birmingham located at UAB-Highlands, 1201 11th Avenue S, Suite 501, Birmingham, Alabama 35205 and staffed by UAB Medicine eye doctors and eye specialists.

Monday, March 2, 2020

Top 5 AMD Risk Factors


Age Related Macular Degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of severe vision loss among Americans ages 65 and over. To help reduce your chance of vision loss from AMD:
  • know the risk factors for AMD,
  • know your family eye & medical history, and
  • Schedule and keep regular eye exam appointments.
The Top 5 Risk Factors for AMD include:
  • Being over the Age of 60
  • Having a Family History of AMD
  • Cigarette Smoking
  • Obesity
  • Hypertension
People with any two of these risk factors should schedule an appointment with an ophthalmologist and people who are at risk should know the symptoms of Wet AMD, the form most likely to cause rapid and serious vision loss including:
  • sudden, noticeable loss of vision, or
  • sudden distortion of vision, such as seeing "wavy" lines. 
See an ophthalmologist right away if these symptoms occur. Treatments for wet AMD provide an excellent chance of stopping vision loss. They may actually restore some vision when macular degeneration develops. Earlier diagnosis of wet AMD gives a better chance of successful treatment.
You can control some AMD risk factors, such as smoking and diet, to reduce the risk of vision loss. One way to reduce AMD risk is to quit smoking or never start. You can't control all your risks, however. For example, you can't do anything about your genetics. Knowing family medical history and sharing it with your ophthalmologist is an important step to protect your vision.

For patients at high risk for developing late-stage wet AMD, taking a specific, AMD dietary supplement lowers that risk by 25 percent. However, patients should check with their ophthalmologist before starting any dietary supplement!

Thursday, February 20, 2020

Michelson LASIK for Leland



“It feels like a miracle but the doctors call it LASIK. Dr. Marc did the surgery on me yesterday and today my sight is crystal clear. I’m now 20/15 and can see things I haven’t seen in years. Easy procedure, easy recovery and I’m excited to never have to think about glasses and contacts again. If you are apprehensive about it, just go see Doctors Marc and Jennifer at Michelson and see if it’s for you. I’m Thrilled”-Leland 

If you or some you know is tired of the hassle of glasses or contact lenses for seeing at distance and would like to find out if LASIK might be a good vision correction option, please call Michelson Laser Vision, Inc. in Birmingham at 205-969-8100, visit Michelson Laser Vision, or www.facebook.com/michelsonlaservision.

Michelson Laser Vision, Inc. is a leading LASIK center in Birmingham located at UAB-Highlands, 1201 11th Avenue S, Suite 501, Birmingham, Alabama 35205 and staffed by UAB Medicine eye doctors and eye specialists.