Sunday, February 10, 2019

Taking Aspirin Makes AMD Worse?




Does Taking Aspirin Make Macular Degeneration Worse? 
Most seniors and other people who suffer from vascular, heart, blood clotting problems or even arthritis are well aware of the benefits of taking a daily aspirin. In fact many people have been prescribed low dose aspirin as part of their overall care by their primary care or other specialty physicians. Seniors are also aware that age related macular degeneration (AMD) continues to be a leading cause of vision loss. Until recently there was some confusion and disagreement regarding whether it was safe or even risky for those who have AMD to take aspirin as it could increase bleeding risk in the retina and worsen AMD. A very careful review of information was reported in the journal Retina and provided insight concluding that the clinical studies showing the positive benefits of aspirin for cardiovascular health were quite a bit better that the limited studies showing a possible adverse effect of aspirin use in relation to AMD. The benefits of low dose aspirin include preserving the duration and quality of life by decreasing stroke and heart attack risk. These benefits seem to far outweigh the theoretical risks of possibly exacerbating wet AMD, which we can now control reasonably well with anti-VEGF injection therapy with Eylea®, Lucentis® and other available medications.

If you or someone you know takes aspirin and has or has been recently diagnosed with age related macular degeneration (AMD) it appears safe and beneficial to follow your physicians prescribing instructions and not worry about any increased risk of worsening AMD. If you have questions or need to schedule an eye exam please call Alabama Eye & Cataract Center, P.C. in Birmingham at 205-930-0930, visit Alabama Eye & Cataract Center, Google+ or www.facebook.com/alabamaeyeandcataractcenter.

Michelson Laser Vision, Inc. and Alabama Eye & Cataract Center, P.C. are leading eye care centers in Birmingham located at UAB-Highlands, 1201 11th Avenue S, Suite 501, Birmingham, Alabama 35205 and staffed by UAB Medicine eye doctors and eye specialists.

Sunday, February 3, 2019

Prevent Falling in Glaucoma Patients


Patients who have glaucoma, especially those with poor vision and very limited visual fields, need to exercise care and prevention, and take steps to avoid falling. These patients are a high risk group and are prone to have bone fractures when they do take a fall. In a recent study reported in the American Journal of Ophthalmology it was determined that most common causes of falling were tripping and slipping due to uneven flooring and poor vision. Almost 75% of falls occur in the home and more than 40% of people who fall suffer some type of injury. 

There are some common sense steps we can take to help prevent falling and thus prevent injury. These include:

>Clean up clutter and remove or repair any tripping hazards such as newspapers, pet items, loose rugs and damaged floorboards or tile.
>Install adequate lighting by placing stronger bulbs in fixtures to be sure hallways and rooms are very well illuminated.
>Install grab bars on stairs and in bathrooms as well as installing non-slip mats in showers and tubs.
>Always wear shoes to avoid the risk of slipping and if shoes are just too uncomfortable, be sure to buy non slip socks.
>Take your time getting up from chairs or sofas and move slowly at first.

These simple fall prevention interventions, particularly those for minor home modification, should be an adequate starting point to prevent falls. If you or someone you know has glaucoma
Or suffers from poor vision, know that they are at greater risk for falling. Be sure they have a thorough eye exam by scheduling an appointment at Alabama Eye & Cataract Center, P.C. in Birmingham at 205-930-0930, visit Alabama Eye & Cataract Center, Google+ or www.facebook.com/alabamaeyeandcataractcenter.

Michelson Laser Vision, Inc. and Alabama Eye & Cataract Center, P.C. are leading eye care centers in Birmingham located at UAB-Highlands, 1201 11th Avenue S, Suite 501, Birmingham, Alabama 35205 and staffed by UAB Medicine eye doctors and eye specialists.