Sunday, October 11, 2020

How Common is Dry Eye Disease?

 


Dry eye disease (DED) is a multi-factorial ocular surface disease characterized by symptoms of dryness, grittiness, discomfort, irritation, and often visual disturbance. DED can create significant burdens on patients, including problems in social settings, occupational functioning, and reduced quality of life. Known risk factors for DED include female sex, increasing age, and certain systemic health conditions (i.e. autoimmune diseases), and a wide range of medications that are known to result in dry eyes. It is estimated that some 5% to 34% of individuals over 50 suffer from dry eyes depending on the definition of dry eye used to prepare the estimate.

If you or someone you know suffers from dry eyes and has not had a recent eye exam please schedule an appointment at Alabama Eye & Cataract Center in Birmingham at 205-930-0930, visit Alabama Eye & Cataract Center or www.facebook.com/alabamaeyecataractcenter

Alabama Eye & Cataract Center is a leading eye care center in Birmingham located at UAB-Highlands, 1201 11th Avenue S, Suite 501, Birmingham, Alabama 35205 and staffed by UAB Medicine eye doctors and eye specialists.

Thursday, October 8, 2020

Common Causes of Eyelash Loss

 


Eyelashes are more than just a cosmetic fringe! Lashes protect the eye from debris that can obstruct vision or cause infection or injury. Eyelashes grow, fall out and replace themselves in a natural cycle every six to 10 weeks, just like the hair on top of your head. While it’s normal to lose between one and five eyelashes each day, a more rapid lash loss-called “madarosis”-can be a symptom of an underlying health problem in the eye or in another part of the body.

There are many reasons people can lose more lashes than average. If you’re not also losing hair from the eyebrows or scalp, eyelash loss may signal:

  • Irritation from Cosmetics. Leaving eye makeup on too long, using and removing lash extensions and using eyelash curlers, whether heated or non-heated, can all harm lashes and speed up shedding. Eyelash loss can also stem from allergies to mascara and from glue used to apply eyelash extensions.
  • Blepharitis. Itchiness or burning accompanied by redness or swelling of the lids may indicate blepharitis. This is a condition that happens when clogged oil glands near the base of the eyelashes cause chronic inflammation and problems in the eyelash follicles.
  • Trichotillomania. This is a condition where stress or other emotional or psychological distress causes a person to pull out their own eyelashes habitually.
  • Skin Cancer. More rarely, localized lash loss can be a symptom of a skin cancer on the eyelid. Cancer can interrupt eyelash growth as harmful cells spread.

If you or someone you know experiences an abnormal amount of eyelash loss, please schedule an eye exam at Alabama Eye & Cataract Center in Birmingham at 205-930-0930, visit Alabama Eye & Cataract Center or www.facebook.com/alabamaeyecataractcenter.

Alabama Eye & Cataract Center is a leading eye care center in Birmingham located at UAB-Highlands, 1201 11th Avenue S, Suite 501, Birmingham, Alabama 35205 and staffed by UAB Medicine eye doctors and eye specialists.

Saturday, September 19, 2020

Ethnicity Increases Eye Disease Risk

 


While it may be widely known that the risk of vision loss increases with age, you may be less aware that one’s ancestry and ethnicity can play a significant role in increasing odds.

Researchers reporting in the journal Ophthalmology reported a link between African ancestry in Latino-Americans and increased intraocular pressure, a major risk factor for the eye disease glaucoma. This is one of the latest examples of a growing body of research showing that certain minority groups are at greater risk for serious eye conditions that can cause vision loss and blindness if left untreated. As a reminder, Americans of African, Latino and Asian heritage need to be aware of their increased risk for eye diseases. It is sharing information about eye disease among these ethnic groups to encourage people of these backgrounds to take early steps to protect their sight.

Many eye diseases may have no apparent symptoms in their early stages. Signs can remain hidden unless detected through a dilated eye exam. These exams are the best way to detect eye diseases so they can be treated early to help prevent vision loss.

If you or someone you know is of African, Latino and Asian ancestry and concerned about their risk of eye disease, please schedule and eye exam with eye doctors at Alabama Eye & Cataract Center in Birmingham at 205-930-0930, visit Alabama Eye & Cataract Center or www.facebook.com/alabamaeycataractcenter

Alabama Eye & Cataract Center is a leading eye care center in Birmingham located at UAB-Highlands, 1201 11th Avenue S, Suite 501, Birmingham, Alabama 35205 and staffed by UAB Medicine eye doctors and eye specialists.

Tuesday, September 1, 2020

Causes of Night Vision Problems

 


It’s no surprise that most people don’t see well in the dark. However, some people have considerable difficulty seeing at night or in poor light. This is called “night blindness” or nyctalopia. Night blindness doesn’t mean you are completely unable to see at night, but that your vision is poorer then. It is not a disease in itself, but instead is a symptom of some other type of vision problem. Certain cells in the eye’s retina are responsible for allowing you to see in dim light. If these cells are affected by a disease or condition, night blindness occurs.

Some of the eye conditions that can cause night blindness include:

If you or someone you know has difficulty seeing at night-especially if it seems to be getting worse-please schedule an eye exam with eye doctors at Alabama Eye & Cataract Center in Birmingham at 205-930-0930, visit Alabama Eye & Cataract Center or www.facebook.com/alabamaeyecataractcenter.

Alabama Eye & Cataract Center is a leading eye care center in Birmingham located at UAB-Highlands, 1201 11th Avenue S, Suite 501, Birmingham, Alabama 35205 and staffed by UAB Medicine eye doctors and eye specialists.

Tuesday, August 25, 2020

Right Choice for LASIK

“What a great experience and outcome! I have been wearing glasses for over well over forty years with a terrible astigmatism. Dr Michelson has me seeing 20/20. His staff has been great, especially Teri. I chose Dr. Michelson after a recommendation from my Ophthalmologist and my research. This was definitely the right choice for me. It really is life changing.”-Greg

If you or some you know is tired of the hassle of glasses or contact lenses for seeing at distance and would like to find out if LASIK might be a good vision correction option, please call Michelson Laser Vision, Inc. in Birmingham at 205-969-8100, visit Michelson Laser Vision, or www.facebook.com/michelsonlaservision.

Michelson Laser Vision, Inc. is a leading LASIK center in Birmingham located at UAB-Highlands, 1201 11th Avenue S, Suite 501, Birmingham, Alabama 35205 and staffed by UAB Medicine eye doctors and eye specialists.

Monday, August 17, 2020

Seven Myths Regarding Children's Eyes

 

Seven Myths Regarding Children's Eyes

#1 Pink eye only happens in young children. While young kids are known for getting pink eye, due to close contact in day care centers, so can teenagers, college students, and adults-especially those who don’t clean their contacts. The best way to keep pink eye from spreading is to practice good hygiene, including washing your hands, not touching your eyes, and using clean towels and other products around the face.

#2 Antibiotics are necessary to cure your child’s pink eye. Antibiotics are rarely necessary to treat pink eye. There are three types of pink eye: Viral, Bacterial & Allergic Conjunctivitis. Most cases are caused by viral infections or allergies and do not respond to antibiotics. Antibiotics may be prescribed for bacterial conjunctivitis depending on severity. Mild cases of bacterial conjunctivitis usually resolve on their own within 7 to 14 days without treatment.

#3 Sun is bad for your eyes. While it’s true that long-term exposure to the sun without proper protection can increase the risk of eye disease, some studies suggest sun exposure is necessary for normal visual development. Children who have less sun exposure seem to be at higher risk for developing myopia or nearsightedness. Just make sure they’re protected with UV-blocking sunglasses and sunscreen.

#4 Blue light from screens is damaging children’s vision. Contrary to what you may be reading on the internet, blue light is not blinding you or your screen-obsessed kids. While it is true that nearsightedness is becoming more common, blue light isn’t the culprit. In fact, we are exposed to much more blue light naturally from the sun than we are from our screens. The important thing to remember is to take frequent breaks. Use the 20-20-20 rule: look at an object at least 20 feet away every 20 minutes for at least 20 seconds.

#5 Vision loss only happens to adults. The eyes of a child with amblyopia (lazy eye) may look normal, but this eye condition can steal sight if not treated. Amblyopia is when vision in one of the child’s eyes is reduced because the eye and brain are not working together properly. Strabismus (crossed eyes) is another eye condition that can cause vision loss in a child. Strabismus is when the eyes do not line up in the same direction when focusing on an object.

#6 All farsighted children need glasses. Most children are farsighted early in life. It’s actually normal. It doesn’t necessarily mean your child needs glasses because they use their focusing muscles to provide clear vision for both distance and near vision. Children do need glasses when their farsightedness blurs their vision or leads to strabismus. They will also need glasses if they are significantly more farsighted in one eye compared with the other, a condition that puts them at risk of developing amblyopia.

#7 There is no difference between a vision screening and a vision exam. While it’s true that your child’s eyes should be checked regularly, a less invasive vision screening by a pediatrician, family doctor, ophthalmologist, optometrist, orthoptist, or person trained in vision assessment of preschool children is adequate for most children. If the screening detects a problem, the child may need to see an ophthalmologist or other eye care professional. A comprehensive exam involves the use of eye drops to dilate the pupil, enabling a more thorough investigation of the overall health of the eye and visual system.

If your child has not had a recent eye exam please schedule an appointment at Alabama Eye & Cataract Center in Birmingham at 205-930-0930, visit Alabama Eye & Cataract Center or www.facebook.com/alabamaeyecataractcenter.

Alabama Eye & Cataract Center is a leading eye care center in Birmingham located at UAB-Highlands, 1201 11th Avenue S, Suite 501, Birmingham, Alabama 35205 and staffed by UAB Medicine eye doctors and eye specialists.

Monday, August 10, 2020

Contact Lenses for Itchy Eyes

 

Eye allergies and itchy eyes are quite common. Many prescription and over the counter eye drops are helpful for symptomatic relief of itchy eyes on a temporary basis. Typically allergy sufferers must remove their contact lenses and even discontinue them during the peak seasonal allergy periods. Recently, a study was undertaken to determine the possibility of using a contact lens as a drug delivery system for eye allergy medication. The study was reported in the Cornea Journal in which etafilcon A (Acuvue 2) contact lenses were loaded with ketotifen-an antihistamine-to determine whether itchy eye relief could be achieved while correcting vision. The study concluded that effective ocular allergy treatment could be achieved with this antihistamine-contact lens delivery system and offers potential for contact lens wearers suffering from ocular allergies.

If you are someone you know has not had a recent eye exam please schedule an appointment at Alabama Eye & Cataract Center in Birmingham at 205-930-0930, visit Alabama Eye & Cataract Center or www.facebook.com/alabamaeyecataractcenter.

Alabama Eye & Cataract Center is a leading eye care center in Birmingham located at UAB-Highlands, 1201 11th Avenue S, Suite 501, Birmingham, Alabama 35205 and staffed by UAB Medicine eye doctors and eye specialists.