Thursday, May 21, 2020

Masks: Why Are We All Wearing One?


We know that the primary way people get infected with COVID-19 is through respiratory droplets. Respiratory droplets are released into the air when you sneeze, cough AND talk! The research tells us that face masks-even common cloth masks, surgical masks and non-fit-tested respirators, can be an effective barrier to spreading respiratory droplets. So…we are…and we ask you to…wear a mask please!

We look forward to seeing you soon for your regular eye exams for eye health & vision!
Should you need help for a contact lens irritation, red eye or contact lens problem, PLEASE CALL 205-930-0930 and we can provide you with either a TeleEyeHealth Virtual Visit & Consultation or schedule an appointment for a personal visit at Alabama Eye & Cataract Center.

Alabama Eye & Cataract Center is a leading eye care center in Birmingham located at UAB-Highlands, 1201 11th Avenue S., Suite 501, Birmingham, Alabama 35205 and staffed by UAB Medicine eye doctors and eye specialists.

Wednesday, May 13, 2020

Practical Eye Health Tips for COVID



There are some practical eye health tips and precautions that you should consider to stay safe from COVID risk. We suggest thinking about:
  • If You Wear Contact Lenses, Consider Switching to Glasses for a While. There's no evidence that wearing contact lenses increases your risk of Coronavirus infection, but if you wear contacts, you tend to touch your eyes more than average. Wearing glasses decreases the likelihood and need to touch your eyes.
  • Wearing Glasses May Add a Layer of Protection. Eyeglasses or sunglasses can shield your eyes from infected respiratory droplets in the air, but they don’t provide 100% security. The virus can still reach your eyes from the exposed sides, tops and bottoms of your glasses. If you’re caring for a sick patient or potentially exposed person, safety goggles may offer a stronger defense.
  • Stock Up on Eye Drops and Medicine Prescriptions If You Can. If possible try to stock up on critical medications and eye drops, so that you’ll have enough to get by if you are quarantined or if your pharmacy is unable to fill your refills. If your insurance allows you to get more than 1 month of essential eye medicine, such as glaucoma drops, you should do so. Some insurers will approve a 3-month supply of medication in times of natural disaster. Ask your pharmacist or our office for help if you have trouble getting approval from your insurance company. And as always, request a refill as soon as you’re due. Don’t wait until the last minute to contact your pharmacy. 
  • Avoid Rubbing Your Eyes. Everyone rubs their eyes! We all do it and it can be a tough to stop. But-doing so will lower your risk of infection. If you feel an urge to itch or rub your eye or even to adjust your glasses, use a tissue instead of your fingers. Dry eyes can lead to more rubbing, so consider adding moisturizing drops to your eye routine. If you must touch your eyes for any reason-even to administer eye medicine-wash your hands first with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. Then wash them again afterwards. 
  • We look forward to seeing you soon for your regular eye exams for eye health & vision! In the meantime if you, a friend or relative should need help for a contact lens irritation, red eye or contact lens problem, PLEASE CALL 205-930-0930 and we can provide you with either a TeleEyeHealth Virtual Visit & Consultation  or schedule an appointment for a personal visit at Alabama Eye & Cataract Center.
Visit Alabama Eye & Cataract Center or facebook.com/alabamaeyecataractcenter. Alabama Eye & Cataract Center is a leading eye care center in Birmingham located at UAB-Highlands, 1201 11th Avenue S, Suite 501, Birmingham, Alabama 35205 and staffed by UAB Medicine eye doctors and eye specialists.

Monday, May 4, 2020

COVID Eye Safety & Contact Lenses-What to Know!

COVID  Eye Safety & Contact Lenses

The traditional “best practices” for wearing contact lenses safely may not be sufficient to completely prevent COVID-19 spread, as wearing contact lenses requires a great deal of finger manipulation around the eyelids, nose and mouth in order to insert the lenses. Contact lens wearers often touch their eyes, mouth and nose, putting wearers at risk for contracting the virus. Even with the best care and hygiene the American Academy of Ophthalmology (AAO) recently published recommendations for corona virus eye safety that strongly suggested not wearing contact lenses and keeping everything away from patients’ eyes. That said, you can choose to keep wearing your contact lenses but:

  1. Wash your hands carefully and thoroughly with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, followed by hand drying with unused paper towels. This should occur before every contact lens insertion and removal. If soap and water are not readily available, use a hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol. People should avoid touching their face, including their eyes, nose and mouth, with unwashed hands.
  2. Disinfect or dispose your contact lenses as prescribed by your doctor. Either dispose of your daily disposable lenses each evening, or regularly disinfect your monthly and two-week lenses according to instructions.
  3. Discontinue lens wear if sick. Consistent with recommendations for other types of illness, those who feel ill with cold or flu-like symptoms should cease contact lens wear.

We look forward to seeing you soon for your regular eye exams for eye health & vision! In the meantime if you, a friend or relative should need help for a contact lens irritation, red eye or contact lens, PLEASE CALL 205-930-0930 and we can provide you with either a TeleEyeHealth Virtual Visit & Consultation or schedule an appointment for a personal visit at Alabama Eye & Cataract Center. Visit us at Alabama Eye & Cataract Center at our Eye Care Blog, or on Facebook.

Alabama Eye & Cataract Center is a leading eye care center in Birmingham located at UAB-Highlands, 1201 11th Avenue S, Suite 501, Birmingham, Alabama 35205 and staffed by UAB Medicine eye doctors and eye specialists.

Sunday, April 26, 2020

Pink Eye Conjunctivitis & COVID-19 Coronavirus


Pink eye, known medically as conjunctivitis is an inflammation or infection of the outer membrane of the eyeball and the inner eyelid that causes redness and irritation in and around the eyes. It can be caused by allergies or a bacterial or viral infection. Conjunctivitis can be extremely contagious and is spread by contact with eye secretions from someone who is infected. The American Academy of Ophthalmology alerted us that COVID-19 Coronavirus might cause a pink eye conjunctivitis that looks like any other viral conjunctivitis. Viral conjunctivitis is common in patients who have colds, the flu and other types of viral infection. However, our patients should keep in mind that careful evaluation of the reported information suggests that only between 1-3% of those infected with COVID-19 actually develop pink eye conjunctivitis. We are here to help!

If you, someone you know, a friend, or a relative develops eye redness and thinks they might have pink eye conjunctivitis-PLEASE CALL US-205-930-0930 and we can advise you whether to schedule a TeleEyeHealth Virtual Visit &Consultation, schedule a visit to our office where we use using socialdistancing and sanitary hygienic disinfecting procedures or even ask you to schedule a visit with your primary care physician if you also have a fever, cough or shortness of breath.

We look forward to seeing you soon for your regular eye exams for eye health & vision! In the meantime if you, a friend or relative should need help for a contact lens irritation, red eye or contact lens, PLEASE CALL 205-930-0930 and we can provide you with either a TeleEyeHealth Virtual Visit & Consultation or schedule an appointment for a personal visit at Alabama Eye & Cataract Center.

Visit us at Alabama Eye & Cataract Center, our Eye Care Blog or on FacebookAlabama Eye & Cataract Center is a leading eye care center in Birmingham located at UAB-Highlands, 1201 11th Avenue S, Suite 501, Birmingham, Alabama 35205 and staffed by UAB Medicine eye doctors and eye specialists.

Monday, April 20, 2020

TeleEyeHealth Virtual Visits for Eye Problems


TeleEyeHealth Virtual Visits

At Alabama Eye & Cataract Center we are often able to provide help for certain eye problems & conditions through the use of TeleEyeHealth Virtual Visits & Consultation without having to come to our office. TeleEyeHealth Virtual Visits use electronic & digital communications and software to provide clinical services to patients without an in-person visit. By using your home computer and webcam, or even your phone, we are able to visualize and evaluate urgent eye problems such as a minor eye accident, red eyes, eye pain, irritation, sensitivity to light, eye discharge, matter in eyes, eyelid redness, crusting, eyelids stuck together, excessive tearing, eyes burning, watering, feeling gritty, eyes itching, allergy eyes, eyelid swelling, eyelid lumps or eyelid bumps-and then help you, or if needed, schedule you to come in for an actual office visit. TeleEyeHealth Virtual Visits are covered by almost all insurance plans and help avoid an unnecessary trip to the emergency room or our office.


Tuesday, April 14, 2020

COVID Guidelines You Should Remember!


We are all dealing with the day to day issues and safety concerns created by the COVID-19 virus. As time goes on, and it appears as if we may have reached the peak, sometimes there can be a degree of relaxation of the necessary guidelines and good practices to stop the spread. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) offers these general guidelines for preventing the spread of corona virus and protecting your health:
·        Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds.
·        You should especially wash your hands before eating, after using the restroom, sneezing, coughing or blowing your nose.
·        If you can’t get to a sink, use a hand sanitizer that has at least 60% alcohol.
·        Avoid touching your face-particularly your eyes, nose, and mouth.
·        If you cough or sneeze, cover your face with your elbow or a tissue. If you use a tissue, throw it away promptly. Then go wash your hands.
·        Avoid close contact with sick people. If you think someone has a respiratory infection, it’s safest to stay 6 feet away.
·        Stay home when you are sick.
·        Regularly disinfect commonly touched surfaces and items in your house, such as doorknobs and counter tops.

We look forward to seeing you soon for your regular eye exams for eye health & vision! In the meantime if you, a friend or relative should need help for an urgent eye problem such as an eye accident, red eyes, eye pain, irritation, sensitivity to light, eye discharge, matter in eyes, eyelid redness, crusting, eyelids stuck together, excessive tearing, eyes burning, watering, feeling gritty, eyes itching, allergy eyes, eyelid swelling, eyelid lumps or eyelid bumps, PLEASE CALL 205-930-0930 and we can provide you with either a TeleEyeHealth Virtual Visit & Consultation or schedule an appointment for a personal visit at Alabama Eye & Cataract Center.

Visit Alabama Eye & Cataract Center or www.facebook.com/alabamaeyecataractcenter. Alabama Eye & Cataract Center is a leading eye care center in Birmingham located at UAB-Highlands, 1201 11th Avenue S, Suite 501, Birmingham, Alabama 35205 and staffed by UAB Medicine eye doctors and eye specialists.

Sunday, April 5, 2020

Eye Exams & Diagnosing Alzheimer’s


A recent study published by Duke University researchers in the journal Retina suggests that an observed loss of blood vessels in the retina may reflect changes in brain health and could signal Alzheimer’s disease. In people with healthy brains, microscopic blood vessels form a dense web at the back of the eye inside the retina. In the eyes of people with Alzheimer’s disease, that web was less dense and even sparse in places. The differences in density were statistically significant after researchers controlled for factors including age, sex, and level of education. The study measured blood vessels that can’t be seen during a regular eye exam using noninvasive technology that takes high-resolution images of very small blood vessels within the retina in just a few minutes, called Optical Coherence Tomography-Angiography (OCT-A). They concluded that it’s possible that these changes in blood vessel density in the retina could mirror what’s going on in the tiny blood vessels in the brain, perhaps before we are able to detect any changes in cognition. 

With nearly 6 million Americans living with Alzheimer’s disease and no viable treatments or noninvasive tools for early diagnosis, its burden on families and the economy is heavy. Scientists at have studied other changes in the retina that could signal trouble upstream in the brain, such as thinning of some of the retinal nerve layers. The goal would be to use this technology to detect Alzheimer’s early, before symptoms of memory loss are evident, and be able to monitor these changes over time in participants of clinical trials studying new Alzheimer’s treatments.

Please mention any concerns you have about Alzheimer’s during your regular eye exam. To learn more about new technology and examination techniques we are using, please just ask us at your scheduled appointment.

If you or someone you know has not had a recent eye exam please schedule an appointment at Alabama Eye & Cataract Center in Birmingham at 205-930-0930, visit Alabama Eye & Cataract Center or www.facebook.com/alabamaeyecataractcenter.

Alabama Eye & Cataract Center is a leading eye care center in Birmingham located at UAB-Highlands, 1201 11th Avenue S, Suite 501, Birmingham, Alabama 35205 and staffed by UAB Medicine eye doctors and eye specialists.